Does Your Dentist Need to Know? Health Conditions They Need to Ask

Dentists are concerned about their patient’s oral health, but many of them would tell you that oral health issues are connected to your overall health and well-being. Because of this, dentists always ask health-related questions before you can sit down for a session. This is especially true even when you’re traveling, planning for a big event, or even making a lifestyle change.

Any dental clinic will strive to provide top-rated care, so it is normal for any physician to ask about the medical histories of their patients. Dentists and physicians need to test for the following conditions, so they could help their patients deal with other complexities that could add to their health worries. Here are three things your dentist ought to know about you.

Pregnancy and HIV Status

Before scheduling for an x-ray and other intricate procedures or treatments, your specialist should know if you are expecting a child. With pregnancy comes a change in body hormones that could affect your dental health. For instance, some expectant mothers get tender and sensitive gums that are vulnerable to infection and tooth decay.

But diseases like HIV could also affect your dental health and treatments. An HIV status is personal, but you need to notify your dentist so they could assist in ensuring that issues like thrombocytopenia are prevented. This will be important if you need to have dental surgery or tooth extraction.

Medication

dentist and patient

Some prescriptions could cause drying of the mouth. This, in turn, can leave your teeth vulnerable to decay. Some medicines could also prevent the quick coagulation of blood, and some measures have to be taken before scheduling for oral surgical procedures or tooth extraction.

Another medication that your dentist needs to know is if you take nasal sprays or inhaled medication. These could affect their gums and the lining of the teeth which could cause extreme dryness and cause fungal infections in the mouth.

Cancer

If a patient has cancer, they might be taking medication or treatment that could also affect their oral health. If you are only starting your cancer treatment, you need to see your dentist before you begin the treatment If possible, see your dentist before beginning treatment to ensure your mouth is in good condition. Cancer treatments can have serious effects on your health, so it’s better that you ask your dentist what needs to be done before you take any treatment or medication.

Diabetes

Those with diabetes again suffer from drying of the mouth. Diseases like diabetes might require frequent professional teeth cleaning sessions. Your dentist needs to take countermeasures to keep periodontal disease at bay so you won’t have to suffer the other effects of diabetes.

Reliable dentists will not just want to provide services but will aim at ensuring that their services give their patients the kind of assistance they need. By understanding your health history, a comprehensive care plan can be designed, grounded on your specific needs. For you to have a comfortable and rewarding experience, choose a professional who whom you share good chemistry.